TYPO3 Extension Roundup Q1 + Q2 – 2017

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This is the fifth issue of the TYPO3 extension roundup. Due to the long period covered the number of mentioned extensions is slightly higher than in the last issues. Additionally the release of TYPO3 8LTS increased the number of updated extensions further, which made it quite hard to choose the candidates. Read on for my selection for the first and second quarter of 2017.

Applications & Frontend

Frontend Editing

Unfortunately the “new” frontend editing did not make it into the final release of TYPO3 8LTS. But it is available as an extension, if you want to give it a try:

Events Management

This extension helps you to manage events, performances and its registrations. There are several sister extensions available which extend the functionality with reservations and courses.

Code Snippet Content Element 

Content elements for special purposes are getting more and more widespread and provided as small TYPO3 extensions. One example the “Code Snippet CE” by Daniel Goerz. It uses the t3editor to edit code in the backend and “prism.js” for highlighting the code in the frontend.

Google Calendar

Many of us are using a google calendar f.e. to publish events and meetings in businesses or communities. You can display the dates nicely formatted with this extension on your TYPO3 website.

Location Manager

The location manager makes it easy to display several location in a Google map, filter them by category and to apply custom styles to the map. You can use also the search suggestions by Google.

Weather2

If you have a touristic or holiday site, the weather is important for your customers, especially if they will visit in short time. The extension “weather2” displays weather current weather data and weather alerts.

Backend and Development

Images in CKeditor

Images within a rich text editor is a quite controversal topic. The default feature set of CKEditor does not bring this functionality, but you can add it using the extension “rte_ckeditor_image”

Content Defender

With this extension you can (dis-)allow certain content types via the configuration of backend layouts. After the configuration, your editors are only able to add create certain content elements in specific columns.

TYPO3 console

The TYPO3 console is a tool to perform tasks via command line, which “normally” require interaction. So it is perfectly suited for supporting automated deployments. I already wrote a blog post about the TYPO3 console here: https://typo3worx.eu/2017/05/typo3-console-getting-things-done/.

PDF Viewhelpers

Creating pdfs was always a challenge … how to create a proper pdf out of your data. This extension support you by providing viewhelpers, which make it possible to create native pdf documents with FLUID templates.

SEO

yoast

YOAST is a company, which is providing SEO plugins for several webshops, blog and CMS systems. The extension provides several “live” analysis tools and previews, while writing and saving content.

hreflang Tag

Hreflang tags are quite easy to manage, if you are using a single tree approach for a multilanguage site with a single tree approach. If your customer uses multiple page trees, this task gets tricky. This is where this extension drops in and provides a solution for editors.

Security

Caretaker Mattermost

Caretaker is one of the most used security tools for TYPO3. Getting notified about security incidents a crucial feature for your service. This extension integrates caretaker notifications with the instant messaging tool “Mattermost”. (Perhaps it can also serve as a boilerplate for other IM services like Slack).

Other

Firefox extension

Ok, this is no classical TYPO3 extension, but one for the Firefox browser providing a TYPO3 “workbench”. For more details see the post at TYPO3.com

Conclusion

I hope, that one or more recommendations have been interesting for you. If so or if you know somebody, who could profit from it, please share this post via your favorite social network. For your convenience I added some share buttons at the end of this page.

Credits

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I found the blog post image on pixabay . It was published by Frank Winkler under the CC0 public domain license. I modified it using pablo on buffer.

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